Welcome to The Woodstock Bookshop

The shop opened in May 2008 and is on the main road in Woodstock, just next to the bus stop. We can supply most books to order by the next day and have several thousand books in stock: to order books ring or email the shop. We have a large selection of children's books and are happy to advise and recommend. We can also supply second-hand and out-of-print titles. We offer discounts for school orders and for book clubs and have a free local delivery service.

We were on the regional shortlist for Independent Bookshop of the Year in 2009, 2013 and 2017, and listed in the recent Independent's Top 50 UK Bookshops.

BOOKSHOP TALKS
We hold a series of informal talks and readings throughout the year. If you buy any book at the talk the cost of the ticket will be deducted. Please ring or email to book a place - early booking advisable.

The Woodstock Literature Society and Wootton Village Hall also hold excellent series of monthly talks - do visit their websites for further details.

Twitter: @WoodstockBooks

Thursday, 22 July 2010

Edmund de Waal

The Hare with Amber Eyes is one of the best books I have read this year and I am delighted that Edmund de Waal will be talking about it for The Woodstock Bookshop as part of the Independent Woodstock Literature Festival on Saturday 18 September at 7pm in the Methodist Church. Ceramicist Edmund de Waal traces the history of his family through ownership of a collection of netsuke inherited from his great uncle: the story is fascinating and he writes as well as he throws pots.
Booking will open shortly and I urge you to book in advance. I am not alone in loving it - the book has had great reviews (it was described by Frances Wilson in the Sunday Times as 'a work of rare and sustained brilliance...nobody since Lorna Sage in Bad Blood has shown so well how a memoir can overflow with riches and yet remain light, fragile, compact. Like the netsuke themselves, this book is impossible to put down. You have in your hands a masterpiece.' The review in the Economist was equally ecstatic: 'From a hard and vast archival mass of journals, memoirs, newspaper clippings and art-history books, Mr de Waal has fashioned, stroke by minuscule stroke, a book as fresh with detail as if it had been written from life, and as full of beauty and whimsy as a netsuke from the hands of a master carver. Buy two copies of his book; keep one and give the other to your closest bookish friend'). I imagine tickets will sell out fast.

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